Picture of George Nicola
George Nicola

George is a seasoned interior designer and property marketing strategist with over 13 years of experience. He specializes in transforming properties into visually stunning spaces, helping clients recognize the potential and beauty in each property. With an impressive international client base of exciting projects throughout Europe and America.

Owning a waterfront residence has always been a dream for many, offering picturesque views and a serene lifestyle. The allure of living by the water can be incredibly strong, with benefits that include both emotional satisfaction and potential financial gains. The crucial question is: Are these homes worth the high cost and possible drawbacks?

A man holds two architectural models of waterfront residences, one in each hand, while looking directly at the camera.
A man holds two architectural models of waterfront residences, one in each hand, while looking directly at the camera.

Waterfront properties often come with a hefty price tag, not just for the house itself but for the land it’s on. This premium location offers a sense of exclusivity and tranquility that is hard to find elsewhere. While the initial expense can be high, many see it as a worthwhile investment due to the potential for property value appreciation over time.

However, buyers must also consider the potential downsides. Maintenance costs can be higher due to the wear and tear from water exposure. Additionally, insurance rates for these homes can be steeper, reflecting the increased risk of flood damage. Understanding the balance between these pros and cons is key to deciding if a waterfront residence meets both your lifestyle desires and financial goals.

Who buys waterfront properties?

Waterfront property buyers can vary depending on the location, type of water body (ocean, lake, river), and local market, the common thread is that these buyers are often seeking a luxurious, relaxing lifestyle near the water and have the financial means to afford it.

Waterfront residences with docks and boats line a tree-lined lakeshore on a sunny day, making it clear why investing in this real estate is worth it.
Waterfront residences with docks and boats line a tree-lined lakeshore on a sunny day, making it clear why investing in this real estate is worth it.

Waterfront properties are typically purchased by a variety of buyers, including:

  1. Affluent individuals: Waterfront properties are often more expensive than inland homes, so they tend to attract wealthy buyers who can afford the premium.
  2. Vacation home buyers: Many people purchase waterfront properties as second homes or vacation homes to enjoy during holidays and weekends.
  3. Retirees: Some retirees choose to purchase waterfront properties to enjoy a relaxed lifestyle near the water during their retirement years.
  4. Investors: Waterfront properties can be attractive investments due to their potential for high rental income and long-term appreciation.
  5. Boating and water sports enthusiasts: People who enjoy boating, fishing, swimming, and other water activities may be drawn to waterfront properties for easy access to these pastimes.
  6. Nature lovers: Waterfront living often provides a closer connection to nature, attracting buyers who appreciate beautiful views and wildlife.
  7. Developers: In some cases, developers purchase waterfront land to build and sell new homes or condominiums.

Waterfront Property Values

Several factors need to be considered to determine the worth of a lake, sea or river property accurately.

Location: Location plays a significant role. Homes near the coast, especially those within 500 feet, often see a substantial increase in value. For instance, properties very close to the coast can see their values increase by an estimated 101.9% compared to homes further away. Even properties up to 1,000 feet away can still experience substantial value boosts.

A waterfront with docks, a modern multi-story building, several other buildings, and boats under a clear blue sky highlights the prime real estate of these waterfront residences.
A waterfront with docks, a modern multi-story building, several other buildings, and boats under a clear blue sky highlights the prime real estate of these waterfront residences.

View: View is another major factor. The value of a waterfront home can be influenced greatly by the quality of the view. This includes both width (the distance from left to right) and depth (how far into the distance one can see).

Watercolor painting featuring boats peacefully docked in a serene lake.
Watercolor painting featuring boats peacefully docked in a serene lake.

Access: Access to the water and home is essential. Properties with easy, direct access to both tend to be more valuable. This can include having a private dock or a gently sloping path.

Here are three key factors that can influence the value:

  1. Water View: Quality and clarity of the view.
  2. Location: Proximity to the water and the general desirability of the area.
  3. Access: How easy it is to reach the water and the home.

These factors combined contribute to the overall value of waterfront properties. Evaluations should always include a detailed look at each of these elements to give a complete picture of the property’s worth.

Benefits of Waterfront Residences

Waterfront residences offer stunning views, a variety of recreational activities, and tend to have high resale values. These benefits attract many buyers, making waterfront properties highly sought after.

Scenic Views and Aesthetics

Waterfront homes provide picturesque views that are unique and captivating. Whether it’s a sunrise over a lake or waves crashing on a beach, the beauty of these natural landscapes can be enjoyed from the comfort of your home. These views can provide a sense of tranquility and well-being, reducing stress and enhancing daily life. The aesthetic appeal of water is timeless and often considered a major selling point for such properties.

Aerial view of a coastal neighborhood with Waterfront Residences along a canal, numerous palm trees, and the ocean in the background. Ideal for those seeking a prime real estate investment.
Aerial view of a coastal neighborhood with Waterfront Residences along a canal, numerous palm trees, and the ocean in the background. Ideal for those seeking a prime real estate investment.

Lifestyle and Recreational Opportunities

Living near the water opens up numerous recreational activities. Residents can enjoy activities like boating, fishing, swimming, and kayaking. Access to these activities promotes a healthier and more active lifestyle. Additionally, waterfront properties often come with private docks or access to community marinas, which makes it convenient for residents to engage in water-based activities. This can lead to a vibrant and fulfilling lifestyle

High Demand and Resale Value

Waterfront properties are often in high demand due to their limited availability and unique appeal. This demand contributes to higher property values and can make these homes a good investment. Homes on the water often sell at a premium compared to non-waterfront properties, and they tend to appreciate more over time. High demand ensures that waterfront homes typically maintain their value, making them a desirable asset in any real estate portfolio.

Considerations and Challenges

There are certain risks that comes with owning a waterfront residences – environmental risks, insurance costs, and maintenance and privacy concerns. These factors can strongly influence the enjoyment and financial viability of your property.

Environmental Risks and Insurance

Waterfront properties are often exposed to natural elements like storms, floods, and erosion. Flood insurance is almost always required and can be costly. Areas prone to hurricanes or heavy rains may have even higher premiums.

Erosion is another issue. Shorelines can recede, causing loss of land. This might require expensive repairs or shoreline reinforcement. Saltwater can also damage structures and vegetation, necessitating special building materials and treatments that drive up costs.

Maintenance and Privacy Concerns

Maintaining a waterfront home is more demanding than for an inland property. Saltwater and moisture can lead to corrosion, mold, and mildew, meaning regular upkeep and weather-proofing are essential.

Privacy can also be an issue. Popular waterfront areas attract tourists, leading to crowded beaches and reduced seclusion. This might interrupt the tranquility many seek in a waterfront home. Additionally, public access rights might require homeowners to allow public entry to certain parts of the shoreline.

When marketing a property, it’s essential to identify and highlight its unique selling points to attract the right buyers. By showcasing these standout features in listing photos, descriptions, and promotional materials, real estate professionals can differentiate the home from competitors and generate increased interest among potential buyers.

Why is waterfront property so expensive?

Buying a waterfront home involves significant costs both upfront and over time. These costs can include a higher purchase price, insurance expenses, and maintenance fees.

Initial Investment

The initial cost of purchasing a waterfront property is usually 30% to 50% higher than that of a non-waterfront home. The premium is largely due to the location and the unique views these properties offer. Buyers should expect to pay significantly more for the lot itself as waterfront land is highly sought after.

In addition to the upfront price, there are also closing costs associated with purchasing a high-value property. These can include higher loan origination fees, appraisal costs, and additional inspections. Property taxes are generally higher as well, because the land’s value boosts the assessed value of the property.

Long-term Financial Prospects

Owning a waterfront home comes with long-term financial considerations. While these homes often appreciate well due to their desirable locations, they also incur higher upkeep costs. Maintenance for waterfront properties can be more involved and expensive due to exposure to moisture, salt, and wind, potentially leading to frequent repairs and replacements.

Insurance is another major long-term expense. Flood and homeowners insurance premiums are typically higher, reflecting the increased risk of natural disasters. Moreover, waterfront properties might face stricter regulatory requirements that could entail extra costs for compliance, such as seawall repairs or environmental upkeep.

Do waterfront properties have good resale value?

Waterfront properties generally have strong resale value due to their desirable location and limited supply. Resale value can be influenced by factors such as the specific location (80% of value is determined by location), the condition of the property (well-maintained homes sell for 10-20% more), and market fluctuations (during recessions, prices may dip 5-15%).

Several factors contribute to their value retention and appreciation over time:

  1. Scarcity: Waterfront land is finite, and as populations grow, the demand for these properties often increases, driving up prices.
  2. Desirability: The appeal of living near the water remains high for many buyers, ensuring a consistent demand for waterfront homes.
  3. Rental potential: Waterfront properties can generate substantial rental income, especially in popular vacation destinations, making them attractive to investors.

Waterfront properties may face unique challenges, such as increased exposure to natural disasters like hurricanes and flooding (which occur in 15% of coastal areas annually), higher insurance costs (typically 20-30% more than inland homes), and environmental regulations that can affect renovations or new construction (impacting 30% of waterfront properties).

Despite these potential drawbacks, waterfront properties have historically demonstrated strong long-term appreciation and remain a solid investment for those who can afford the upfront costs and ongoing maintenance.

For example, over the past 50 years, waterfront properties have appreciated at an average rate of 5-7% annually, outpacing the national average for all homes.

7 photo shots every real estate listing must implement

AERIAL SHOT

One of the most popular and on-trend property shots right now is the bird’s-eye view aerial shot. Typically captured with the assistance of a drone, aerial shots give potential homebuyers a unique perspective on an available listing. 

There are a few reasons why the aerial shot is such a crucial one for first-time homebuyer listings. First, they provide clients with a visual context of where the property is situated, how it fits into the surrounding neighborhood, and a more accurate perspective of its size in relation to other properties. 

A first-time homebuyer's dream: a house with a garden and trees.
A first-time homebuyer's dream: a house with a garden and trees.

The aerial shot is a photography technique that captures the exterior of a property from a high vantage point, typically using a drone or a helicopter. This shot provides a bird’s-eye view of the property and its surroundings, offering a comprehensive understanding of the layout, scale, and context. Aerial shots can be captured from directly overhead or at a slight angle, depending on the desired perspective and visual impact.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the aerial shot is its ability to provide a clear and encompassing view of the property and its relationship to the surrounding environment. By showcasing the entire property from above, this technique can highlight its size, shape, and unique features, such as a large lot, pool, or landscaping. Additionally, aerial shots can help potential buyers understand the property’s proximity to nearby amenities, such as parks, schools, or transportation, which can be important selling points.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Lack of detail: While aerial shots provide a comprehensive overview of the property, they may not capture intricate details or architectural features that can be important to potential buyers. This can be addressed by combining aerial shots with other photography techniques, such as close-up exterior shots or interior photography, to provide a more complete representation of the property.
  2. Weather and time of day: Aerial photography is dependent on weather conditions and the time of day, as harsh shadows, glare, or overcast skies can impact the quality and clarity of the images. This can be mitigated by scheduling shoots during optimal lighting conditions, using appropriate camera settings and filters, and having backup plans in case of unfavorable weather.

TOP DOWN SHOT

The top-down aerial shot is a photography technique that captures the exterior of a property from directly overhead, providing a two-dimensional, map-like view of the property and its immediate surroundings. This shot is typically captured using a drone or a helicopter, and it offers a unique perspective that emphasizes the property’s boundaries, layout, and relationship to nearby features.

A first-time homebuyer's dream garden with a house and trees.
A first-time homebuyer's dream garden with a house and trees.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the top-down aerial shot is its ability to provide a clear, unobstructed view of the property’s footprint and its position within the surrounding landscape. This perspective can be particularly useful for properties with large or unusual lot shapes, as it helps potential buyers understand the size and configuration of the land. Additionally, top-down aerial shots can highlight the property’s proximity to nearby amenities or features that may not be visible from ground level, such as a nearby lake or golf course.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Lack of depth and dimension: Because top-down aerial shots provide a flat, two-dimensional view of the property, they may not convey a sense of depth, height, or scale. This can make it difficult for potential buyers to fully appreciate the property’s architectural features or landscaping elements. This limitation can be addressed by combining top-down shots with other photography techniques, such as angled drone shots or ground-level photography, to provide a more well-rounded visual representation.
  2. Limited context: While top-down aerial shots excel at showcasing the property itself, they may not always provide a clear sense of the broader neighborhood or community context. This can be mitigated by including additional shots or information about the surrounding area, such as nearby schools, shopping centers, or transportation links.

High angle shots, captured from a nearby elevated vantage point such as a tall building or hillside, offer a perspective similar to an angled drone shot but typically from a lower altitude. While high angle shots can provide a sense of the property’s setting and surrounding landscape, they may not always capture the entire lot or emphasize the property’s boundaries as effectively as a top-down aerial shot.

High angle shot

The high angle shot, also known as a bird’s eye view, is a photography technique that captures the exterior or interior of a property from an elevated perspective, typically from a higher floor, balcony, or nearby structure. This shot aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the property and its surroundings, giving potential buyers a sense of the layout, scale, and context.

 

A house with a pool in the middle of a city, perfect for first-time homebuyers.
A house with a pool in the middle of a city, perfect for first-time homebuyers.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the high angle shot is its ability to showcase the property in relation to its surroundings, providing a broader context and understanding of the location. By capturing the property from above, this technique can highlight nearby amenities, green spaces, or other attractive features that may appeal to potential buyers. Additionally, high angle shots can be used to emphasize the size and layout of a property, particularly for larger homes or those with unique architectural features, such as courtyard gardens or swimming pools.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Distortion and perspective: Shooting from a high angle can sometimes result in a distorted perspective, making the property appear smaller or less impressive than it is in reality. This can be mitigated by selecting an appropriate height and angle for the shot and using lens correction techniques in post-processing.
  2. Reduced intimacy: While high angle shots provide a comprehensive overview, they may lack the intimacy and connection that eye-level or interior shots can create. This can be addressed by including a mix of different angles and perspectives in the overall property photography portfolio to provide a well-rounded representation.
  3. Logistical challenges: Capturing a high-angle shot may require access to elevated positions, such as neighboring buildings or specialized equipment like drones, which can be logistically challenging or restricted in certain locations. This can be managed by scouting the location in advance, obtaining necessary permissions, and having backup plans in case of accessibility issues.
  4. Lighting and weather: High-angle shots can be more susceptible to changes in lighting and weather conditions, as the elevated perspective may expose the property to harsh shadows, glare, or atmospheric haze. This can be addressed by planning the shoot for optimal times of day, using appropriate camera settings and filters, and being prepared to adapt to changing conditions on the day of the shoot.

IMMERSIVE INSIDER SHOT

The immersive insider shot is a photography technique that aims to capture the interior of a property in a way that makes the viewer feel as if they are standing inside the space. This is achieved by using wide-angle lenses, strategic composition, and careful attention to lighting and detail. The goal is to create an image that showcases the room’s best features, conveys a sense of depth and space, and evokes an emotional response from potential buyers.

Using plenty of natural light, light-reflecting tools, and a camera that takes high quality shots with excellent clarity brings the inside of any property to life. This attracts buyers who are looking for more detailed images that truly reflect the interior of a home. 

A room with a couch and a book, perfect for first-time homebuyers.
A room with a couch and a book, perfect for first-time homebuyers.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the immersive insider shot is its ability to create a strong emotional connection between the viewer and the property. By making the viewer feel as if they are physically present in the space, this technique can help potential buyers envision themselves living in the home and create a sense of attachment or desire. Additionally, immersive insider shots can showcase the unique character and style of a room, highlight key features or selling points, and provide a more comprehensive understanding of the layout and flow of the interior space.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Distortion and perspective: Wide-angle lenses, which are often used for immersive insider shots, can sometimes result in distortion or exaggerated perspective, particularly around the edges of the frame. This can make the space appear larger or more elongated than it is in reality, which may be misleading for potential buyers. This can be mitigated by using appropriate focal lengths, correcting for distortion in post-processing, and including additional shots from different angles to provide a more accurate representation of the space.
  2. Lighting challenges: Capturing an immersive insider shot that showcases the best features of a room often requires careful control and balance of lighting. Harsh shadows, glare, or uneven illumination can detract from the overall impact of the image and make the space feel less inviting. This can be addressed by using professional lighting equipment, techniques like HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography, and post-processing to optimize exposure and color balance.
  3. Styling and decluttering: To create an effective immersive insider shot, the room must be carefully styled and decluttered to remove any distracting or unappealing elements. This can be time-consuming and may require collaboration with homeowners or professional stagers, which can add to the overall cost and complexity of the shoot. However, investing in proper styling and preparation can greatly enhance the final result and increase the property’s appeal to potential buyers.
  4. Limited context: While immersive insider shots provide a detailed and engaging view of individual rooms, they may not always convey the broader context or layout of the property as a whole. This can be addressed by including a mix of wide-angle and detail shots, as well as supplementary materials like floor plans or virtual tours, to help potential buyers understand how the various spaces relate to one another and fit within the overall structure of the home.

GUIDED WALKABOUT SHOTS (AND VIDEOS)

Guided walkabout shots and videos are a dynamic and engaging way to showcase a property, providing potential buyers with an immersive, first-person perspective of the home and its features. This technique involves a guided tour of the property, typically led by a real estate agent or the homeowner, who walks through the space while capturing video footage or a series of photographs.

With video content performing exceptionally well on just about every social media platform, adding motion to your property listing gallery is a great mechanism for added impact and online traffic. Short videos and walkthroughs give buyers a real feel for a property and make it even easier for you to show off special features that deserve a closer look.

A drawing of a living room, showcasing must-have shots for listings.
A drawing of a living room, showcasing must-have shots for listings.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of guided walkabout shots and videos is their ability to create a sense of personal connection and familiarity with the property. By simulating the experience of walking through the home, this technique allows potential buyers to better understand the layout, flow, and scale of the space, as well as discover unique features and details that may not be apparent in static images. Additionally, the guided aspect of the walkabout provides an opportunity to highlight key selling points, provide context and commentary, and create a more engaging and memorable experience for viewers.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Quality and stability: Capturing high-quality, stable footage while walking through a property can be challenging, particularly if the person guiding the tour is not experienced with videography techniques. Shaky, poorly lit, or low-resolution footage can be distracting and may not showcase the property in its best light. This can be mitigated by using stabilized equipment, such as gimbals or steadicams, and ensuring proper lighting and camera settings.
  2. Length and pacing: Guided walkabout videos can sometimes be lengthy or slow-paced, which may cause viewers to lose interest or skip ahead. This can be addressed by carefully planning the route and content of the tour, using engaging commentary and visual cues to maintain viewer attention, and editing the final footage to a concise and dynamic format.
  3. Limited artistic control: Unlike static photography, guided walkabout shots and videos may not allow for as much control over composition, lighting, and styling. This can result in a more candid or less polished appearance, which may not always align with the desired brand aesthetic. This can be managed by setting clear guidelines and expectations for the tour, rehearsing the route and content in advance, and using post-processing techniques to enhance the final product.
  4. Accessibility and viewing limitations: Guided walkabout videos may not always be easily accessible or viewable for all potential buyers, particularly those with slower internet connections or limited bandwidth. Additionally, some viewers may prefer to explore the property at their own pace or focus on specific areas of interest, which may not be possible with a pre-recorded tour. This can be addressed by offering multiple viewing options, such as downloadable files or interactive 360-degree tours, and providing supplementary materials like floor plans and static images.
 

Rules for Walkthrough filming

To capture effective guided walkabout shots and videos for first-time homebuyer listings, it’s important to think beyond static imagery. With video content performing exceptionally well on social media platforms, adding motion to your property listing gallery is a great way to increase impact and online traffic.

Focus on the following focal points when filming walkthroughs for different property types:

  1. Plan your route in advance: Before starting to record, map out a logical path that flows smoothly from one area to the next. This helps create a coherent narrative and avoids disorienting jumps or backtracking.
  2. Highlight key features: As you move through the property, focus on unique selling points and attractive features that will catch a buyer’s eye. Linger on impressive architectural details, updated fixtures, spacious rooms, and desirable amenities.
  3. Use a stabilizer: To prevent shaky or jarring footage, use a gimbal stabilizer or steadicam to keep the camera smooth and level while you walk. This creates a more polished and professional look that’s easier for viewers to follow.

Short videos and walkthroughs following these guidelines give potential buyers a real feel for the property and allow you to showcase its most appealing aspects in a dynamic and engaging way. This type of immersive content can help your listings stand out and attract more serious first-time homebuyers when combined with eye-level shots.

EYE-LEVEL SHOT

The eye-level shot is a photography technique that captures the exterior or interior of a property from a height that simulates the perspective of a person standing in front of or inside the home. This shot aims to provide a more natural and relatable view of the property, allowing potential buyers to imagine themselves in the space.

A kitchen with a large island and stools, perfect for first-time homebuyers browsing listings.
A kitchen with a large island and stools, perfect for first-time homebuyers browsing listings.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the eye-level shot is its ability to create a sense of familiarity and relatability for potential buyers. By presenting the property from a perspective that mimics human vision, the eye-level shot helps viewers feel more connected to the space and visualize themselves living there. This technique is particularly effective for showcasing the flow and layout of a home’s interior, as it provides a more accurate representation of how rooms connect and how the space would be experienced in person.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Less dramatic impact: Compared to the upward-facing ground floor shot or other more creative angles, the eye-level shot may not have the same dramatic or attention-grabbing impact. This can be mitigated by ensuring the composition, lighting, and styling of the shot are carefully considered to create an engaging and attractive image.
  2. Limited sense of scale: Eye-level shots may not always convey the full scale or grandeur of a property, especially for larger or more impressive homes. This can be addressed by including additional shots from different angles or using a wider lens to capture more of the space in a single frame.
  3. Obstructed views: In some cases, eye-level shots may be obstructed by furniture, walls, or other elements within the property, making it difficult to showcase certain features or convey the full layout. This can be overcome by carefully selecting the best vantage points and using supplementary shots to provide a more comprehensive view of the space.
  4. Reduced privacy perception: Eye-level shots that include windows or other openings may create a sense of reduced privacy, as they simulate the perspective of someone looking directly into the property. This can be managed by carefully selecting the angles and framing of the shots to minimize any potential concerns.

UPWARD-FACING GROUND FLOOR SHOT

The upward-facing ground floor shot, also known as the “hero shot,” is a photography technique that captures the exterior of a property from a low angle, pointing upwards to emphasize the grandeur and scale of the building. This shot is often used to showcase the front facade, entrance, or unique architectural features of a home.

High angled photo of a entrance of a house for sale
High angled photo of a entrance of a house for sale

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the upward-facing ground floor shot is its ability to create a sense of grandeur and importance. By shooting from a low angle, the property appears larger and more impressive, which can help attract potential buyers’ attention and create a memorable first impression. This technique is particularly effective for highlighting distinctive design elements, such as columns, arches, or intricate brickwork, making the property stand out from others on the market.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Distortion: Shooting from a low angle can sometimes result in a slightly distorted perspective, making vertical lines appear to converge or causing the property to look disproportionate. This can be mitigated by using a tilt-shift lens or correcting the perspective in post-processing.
  2. Limited context: The upward-facing ground floor shot often focuses solely on the property itself, which may not provide much context about its surroundings or neighborhood. This can be addressed by including additional shots that showcase the property’s location and nearby amenities.
  3. Reduced relatability: While the hero shot can create a striking visual impact, it may not always feel as relatable or inviting to potential buyers compared to eye-level shots that provide a more natural perspective. Consider balancing upward-facing shots with other angles to give a comprehensive view of the property.
  4. Lighting challenges: Depending on the time of day and the property’s orientation, achieving the perfect lighting for an upward-facing shot can be challenging. Harsh shadows or overexposed areas may require additional equipment or post-processing to ensure the final image looks its best.

COMMON REAL ESTATE SOCIAL MEDIA PITFALLS: HOW TO AVOID MISTAKES

To avoid common real estate social media pitfalls, incorporate catchy headlines, generate leads on visual content platforms, and use the right camera.

Catchy headlines that capture the essence of what makes a listing unique help grab buyers’ attention more quickly and connect them with the content they are most interested in, if the headlines directly relate to compelling shots.

Visual content platforms like Instagram, TikTok, and Pinterest are great places to gather inspiration (pinterest) and generate leads (TikTok and Instagram), if you engage with audience members and industry collaborators to build meaningful relationships online.

Getting the perfect shot for first-time homebuyer listings starts with the right real estate camera.

Choose from a range of cameras depending on your needs, such as drones for immersive, high-quality aerial shots that showcase the property’s surroundings and overall layout, if you want to provide a unique perspective and highlight the location’s appeal.

Good real estate DSLRs are ideal for capturing high-resolution interior and exterior images with excellent depth of field, if you need to emphasize the property’s architectural details and design elements.

Smartphones equipped with gimbals and wide lenses are perfect for creating engaging, authentic video content and behind-the-scenes footage, if you want to give potential buyers a more personal and relatable look at the property and your real estate agency.

A man in a suit standing in front of a toilet, featured in must-have shots for first-time homebuyer listings.
A man in a suit standing in front of a toilet, featured in not must-have shots for first-time homebuyer listings.

The importance of capturing shots that convey the full potential of the property cannot be emphasized enough. By avoiding common real estate marketing mistakes, you can avoid losing out on first-time buyers and instead create listings that stand out and inspire potential sales.

TAKE SHOTS THAT SELL HOUSES

Taking a wide variety of shots from every angle and making sure they are captured with the right camera will ensure your property images stand out among the crowd. It will also help you to generate real estate leads, increase engagement, and, most importantly, close a sale.

Real estate marketing is multi-faceted, but if you get these shots right, you’re well on your way to attracting your target audience and selling them their first homes.