What first-time homebuyers want to see on listing photos?

To attract the interest of the first-time homebuyers, listing photos for low-priced or basic homes should highlight affordability, functionality, and potential for personalization; listings for mid-range houses should focus first on space, storage, and family-friendly features; and high-end luxury listings should prioritize unique architectural details, premium finishes, and exclusive amenities. Every listing must include at least one aerial photo of where the property is located and realistic representation of home’s condition.

The main difference in listing photo priorities across property types is the balance between practicality and aspirational features:

Low-priced homes emphasize value and potential as the ideal home, with photos featuring.

  • Recent updates or well-maintained aspects that convey affordability
  • Functional spaces that buyers can easily envision adapting to their needs
  • Location priority

Proximity to amenities and community features that add value.

Mid-range houses must a balance between functionality, desirability, highlighting attractive curb appeal.

  • Ample space for growing families, including storage solutions and backyard areas
  • Modern upgrades and finishes that offer comfort and convenience
  • Attractive curb appeal and location benefits like schools and shopping

Luxury listings should prioritize premium features and exclusivity, showcasing privacy, exclusivity and high-end craftsmanship and materials.

  • High-end materials, craftsmanship, and architectural details that set the property apart
  • Lavish amenities and outdoor living spaces that cater to an upscale lifestyle
  • Stunning views, privacy, and neighborhood prestige that justify the higher price point

All property types benefit from high-quality, comprehensive photography that:

  • Offers a realistic and transparent representation of the home’s condition and layout
  • Helps buyers envision themselves living in the space through well-lit, clutter-free images
  • Provides context about the surrounding neighborhood and location-based advantages

By understanding these key differences and tailoring listing photos accordingly, real estate professionals can effectively capture the attention of first-time homebuyers at various price points and help them find their ideal home.

Picture of George Nicola
George Nicola

George is a seasoned interior designer and property marketing strategist with over 13 years of experience. He specializes in transforming properties into visually stunning spaces, helping clients recognize the potential and beauty in each property. With an impressive international client base of exciting projects throughout Europe and America.

In this digitized marketing age, capturing engaging social media content shots could not be more important. Knowing how to curate a stand-out visual property listing makes your real estate agency more competitive and compels first-time homebuyers to take faster action.

Poor-quality, static images that fail to highlight a property’s unique attributes can deter potential first-time homebuyers, leading to decreased social media engagement, reduced online visibility, and ultimately, slower sales and missed opportunities in the competitive real estate market.

Quality, dynamic shots for first-time homebuyer listings also help showcase each property’s most social media-friendly angles and features, driving sales and generating crucial online web traffic.

So, when it comes to capturing your property’s best sides, where do you start? 

Taking the photo is one thing, but optimizing real estate for social media is another.

Below, we’ll take you through seven must-have shots for every property listing and some tips for avoiding common real estate marketing pitfalls.

What are the must do types of shots for a listing?

To create a compelling listing that captures the attention of potential buyers, start by defining who is the buyer type; first-time, second-home and luxury buyers look at different details and adapting them defines how the listing would look like.

The most important types of shots that are the core of UPS of a property are:

Exterior front shot: A well-composed, eye-catching photo of the property’s front exterior and landscaping to create a strong first impression. If the location is a main selling point, include an additional aerial shot to showcase the surroundings.

A must-have flyer for real estate listings, perfect for the first-time homebuyer.
A must-have flyer for real estate listings, perfect for the first-time homebuyer.

Living room: Showcase the main living area’s size, layout, and features like fireplaces or built-ins to help buyers envision themselves in the space. If the home has a flexible space with great potential, use staging to suggest how the room could be used.

A website showing new listings for first-time homebuyers.
A website showing new listings for first-time homebuyers.

Master bedroom: Feature the master suite’s size, natural light, and any unique details like vaulted ceilings or en-suite bathrooms. If the master bedroom boasts a stunning view, frame the photo to include it.

A screen shot of a real estate listing for first-time homebuyers.
A screen shot of a real estate listing for first-time homebuyers.

Kitchen: Highlight updated appliances, countertops, and cabinetry in the kitchen, as this is often a key selling point for many buyers. If the kitchen offers ample storage and workspace, ensure the photo conveys that clearly.

A listing page for a new listing in Talbox, perfect for the first-time homebuyer.
A listing page for a new listing in Talbox, perfect for the first-time homebuyer.

Bathrooms: Include photos of updated or spacious bathrooms, focusing on modern fixtures, tilework, and storage solutions. If a bathroom is small but beautifully remodeled, use wide angles to give a sense of spaciousness.

Outdoor living spaces: Showcase desirable outdoor areas like patios, decks, or pools that extend the home’s livable space and entertainment potential. If the outdoor area offers privacy or seclusion, try to capture that feeling in the image.

Unique features or selling points: Highlight any standout features that set the property apart, such as a home office, finished basement, or scenic views. For unique architectural details, consider closer-up shots in addition to the room-wide photo.

In addition to these key shots, consider including:

  • Secondary bedrooms to give a complete picture of the home’s layout and size
  • Dining areas or breakfast nooks that showcase the home’s entertaining potential
  • Laundry rooms or mudrooms that highlight the home’s functionality and storage
  • Detached garages, sheds, or other external structures that add value to the property

When photographing a listing in bad condition, the goal is to showcase the property’s potential while being honest about its current state. Here are some tips to help you effectively photograph a listing in poor condition:

Focus on the property’s best features:

  • Highlight unique architectural details, large windows, or desirable location aspects
  • Emphasize the potential for renovation or customization

Use natural light to your advantage:

  • Open curtains and blinds to let in as much natural light as possible
  • Schedule the photoshoot during the brightest part of the day
  • Avoid using flash, as it can create harsh shadows and emphasize flaws

Declutter and clean:

  • Remove any personal items, trash, or debris that could distract from the property’s features
  • Perform basic cleaning, such as dusting surfaces, wiping down windows, and sweeping floors
  • Consider simple staging techniques, like adding fresh towels or a vase of flowers, to create a more inviting atmosphere

Choose the right angles and compositions:

  • Use wide-angle lenses to capture more of the space and make rooms appear larger
  • Shoot from corners to showcase the full layout of each room
  • Avoid angles that highlight damage or disrepair, but don’t mislead potential buyers

Be strategic with exterior shots:

  • Photograph the exterior on a clear, sunny day to maximize curb appeal
  • Focus on the home’s best exterior features, such as a large yard or mature trees
  • If the exterior is in poor condition, consider shooting from angles that minimize flaws or highlight the potential for improvement

Provide context through captions or descriptions:

  • Accompany photos with honest, factual descriptions of the property’s condition
  • Highlight the potential for renovation or updates, and suggest possible improvements
  • Be transparent about any major issues or repairs that will need to be addressed

Consider virtual staging or renderings:

  • If the property is in very poor condition, consider using virtual staging to help buyers visualize its potential
  • Create renderings or 3D models that showcase possible renovations or upgrades
  • Clearly label any virtually staged or rendered images to avoid misleading potential buyers

Remember, while it’s important to showcase the property in the best possible light, it’s equally crucial to be honest and transparent about its condition. By finding a balance between highlighting potential and accurately representing the home’s current state, you can effectively market the listing to the right buyers.

When selecting and arranging the photos for your listing, prioritize the shots that best showcase the property’s unique selling points and cater to your target buyer demographics. High-quality, well-composed images can make a significant impact on how potential buyers perceive the home and whether they take the next steps to schedule a viewing or make an offer.

What are unique selling points in a house?

Unique selling points (USPs) in a house are features or characteristics that set the property apart from others on the market, making it more attractive to potential buyers. These features can vary depending on the location, style, and age of the home. Some common unique selling points include:

Location:

  • Proximity to desirable amenities, such as top-rated schools, parks, shopping, or public transportation
  • Scenic views of mountains, water, or cityscapes
  • Quiet, safe, or prestigious neighborhoods

Architectural style and character:

  • Historic or period-specific details, such as original fireplaces, stained glass windows, or intricate woodwork
  • Unique architectural styles like Victorian, Mid-Century Modern, or Craftsman
  • Open floor plans or flexible layouts that cater to modern lifestyles

High-end finishes and upgrades:

  • Custom cabinetry, granite countertops, or professional-grade appliances in the kitchen
  • Luxurious bathroom features like spa tubs, rainfall showers, or heated floors
  • Smart home technology, energy-efficient systems, or solar panels

Outdoor living spaces:

  • Large, beautifully landscaped yards or gardens
  • Outdoor kitchens, fire pits, or built-in seating areas
  • Swimming pools, hot tubs, or sports courts

Additional rooms or bonus spaces:

  • Dedicated home offices, libraries, or media rooms
  • Finished basements or attics that provide extra living space
  • In-law suites or guest quarters with separate entrances

Storage and organization:

  • Ample closet space, walk-in pantries, or built-in storage solutions
  • Mudrooms or laundry rooms with custom organization systems
  • Oversized garages or separate workshop spaces

Historic or cultural significance:

  • Homes designed by renowned architects or previously owned by notable figures
  • Properties with unique histories or connections to local heritage
  • Landmark status or location within historic districts

When marketing a property, it’s essential to identify and highlight its unique selling points to attract the right buyers. By showcasing these standout features in listing photos, descriptions, and promotional materials, real estate professionals can differentiate the home from competitors and generate increased interest among potential buyers.

How first time vs second home buyers shop for property?

First-time homebuyers and second-home buyers approach property shopping with different priorities and considerations, although both rely heavily on online listings and real estate photography to narrow down their options.

First-time homebuyers and second-home buyers approach property shopping with different priorities and considerations, although both rely heavily on online listings and real estate photography to narrow down their options.

Key differences in how they shop include:

  1. Budget constraints: First-time buyers often have limited budgets and may need to compromise on size, location, or amenities. Second-home buyers typically have more financial flexibility and can prioritize properties that match their lifestyle preferences.
  2. Financing options: First-time buyers may explore government-backed loans or down payment assistance programs, while second-home buyers often use equity from their primary residence or secure conventional financing.
  3. Location preferences: First-time buyers prioritize proximity to work, schools, and family. Second-home buyers focus on vacation destinations, investment potential, or retirement locations.
  4. Property types: First-time buyers often seek affordable, low-maintenance options like condos or starter homes. Second-home buyers may prefer luxury features, scenic views, or ample space for entertaining.
  5. Emotional attachment: Buying a first home is a major milestone, so first-time buyers may have a stronger emotional connection to the process. Second-home buyers approach it more practically as an investment or lifestyle enhancement.

However, both groups heavily use online resources to:

  • Search for available properties within their desired parameters
  • View detailed listing information, photos, and virtual tours
  • Compare prices, features, and neighborhoods
  • Contact real estate agents for additional information or to schedule viewings
  • Evaluate property condition, potential repairs, and long-term maintenance needs

Regardless of the buyer type, high-quality real estate photography remains crucial for capturing attention, showcasing key selling points, and encouraging serious buyers to take the next steps. Agents who understand the unique needs and shopping habits of first-time vs. second-home buyers can better tailor their listings and marketing strategies to attract the right audience.

7 photo shots every real estate listing must implement

AERIAL SHOT

One of the most popular and on-trend property shots right now is the bird’s-eye view aerial shot. Typically captured with the assistance of a drone, aerial shots give potential homebuyers a unique perspective on an available listing. 

There are a few reasons why the aerial shot is such a crucial one for first-time homebuyer listings. First, they provide clients with a visual context of where the property is situated, how it fits into the surrounding neighborhood, and a more accurate perspective of its size in relation to other properties. 

A first-time homebuyer's dream: a house with a garden and trees.
A first-time homebuyer's dream: a house with a garden and trees.

The aerial shot is a photography technique that captures the exterior of a property from a high vantage point, typically using a drone or a helicopter. This shot provides a bird’s-eye view of the property and its surroundings, offering a comprehensive understanding of the layout, scale, and context. Aerial shots can be captured from directly overhead or at a slight angle, depending on the desired perspective and visual impact.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the aerial shot is its ability to provide a clear and encompassing view of the property and its relationship to the surrounding environment. By showcasing the entire property from above, this technique can highlight its size, shape, and unique features, such as a large lot, pool, or landscaping. Additionally, aerial shots can help potential buyers understand the property’s proximity to nearby amenities, such as parks, schools, or transportation, which can be important selling points.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Lack of detail: While aerial shots provide a comprehensive overview of the property, they may not capture intricate details or architectural features that can be important to potential buyers. This can be addressed by combining aerial shots with other photography techniques, such as close-up exterior shots or interior photography, to provide a more complete representation of the property.
  2. Weather and time of day: Aerial photography is dependent on weather conditions and the time of day, as harsh shadows, glare, or overcast skies can impact the quality and clarity of the images. This can be mitigated by scheduling shoots during optimal lighting conditions, using appropriate camera settings and filters, and having backup plans in case of unfavorable weather.

TOP DOWN SHOT

The top-down aerial shot is a photography technique that captures the exterior of a property from directly overhead, providing a two-dimensional, map-like view of the property and its immediate surroundings. This shot is typically captured using a drone or a helicopter, and it offers a unique perspective that emphasizes the property’s boundaries, layout, and relationship to nearby features.

A first-time homebuyer's dream garden with a house and trees.
A first-time homebuyer's dream garden with a house and trees.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the top-down aerial shot is its ability to provide a clear, unobstructed view of the property’s footprint and its position within the surrounding landscape. This perspective can be particularly useful for properties with large or unusual lot shapes, as it helps potential buyers understand the size and configuration of the land. Additionally, top-down aerial shots can highlight the property’s proximity to nearby amenities or features that may not be visible from ground level, such as a nearby lake or golf course.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Lack of depth and dimension: Because top-down aerial shots provide a flat, two-dimensional view of the property, they may not convey a sense of depth, height, or scale. This can make it difficult for potential buyers to fully appreciate the property’s architectural features or landscaping elements. This limitation can be addressed by combining top-down shots with other photography techniques, such as angled drone shots or ground-level photography, to provide a more well-rounded visual representation.
  2. Limited context: While top-down aerial shots excel at showcasing the property itself, they may not always provide a clear sense of the broader neighborhood or community context. This can be mitigated by including additional shots or information about the surrounding area, such as nearby schools, shopping centers, or transportation links.

High angle shots, captured from a nearby elevated vantage point such as a tall building or hillside, offer a perspective similar to an angled drone shot but typically from a lower altitude. While high angle shots can provide a sense of the property’s setting and surrounding landscape, they may not always capture the entire lot or emphasize the property’s boundaries as effectively as a top-down aerial shot.

High angle shot

The high angle shot, also known as a bird’s eye view, is a photography technique that captures the exterior or interior of a property from an elevated perspective, typically from a higher floor, balcony, or nearby structure. This shot aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the property and its surroundings, giving potential buyers a sense of the layout, scale, and context.

 

A house with a pool in the middle of a city, perfect for first-time homebuyers.
A house with a pool in the middle of a city, perfect for first-time homebuyers.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the high angle shot is its ability to showcase the property in relation to its surroundings, providing a broader context and understanding of the location. By capturing the property from above, this technique can highlight nearby amenities, green spaces, or other attractive features that may appeal to potential buyers. Additionally, high angle shots can be used to emphasize the size and layout of a property, particularly for larger homes or those with unique architectural features, such as courtyard gardens or swimming pools.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Distortion and perspective: Shooting from a high angle can sometimes result in a distorted perspective, making the property appear smaller or less impressive than it is in reality. This can be mitigated by selecting an appropriate height and angle for the shot and using lens correction techniques in post-processing.
  2. Reduced intimacy: While high angle shots provide a comprehensive overview, they may lack the intimacy and connection that eye-level or interior shots can create. This can be addressed by including a mix of different angles and perspectives in the overall property photography portfolio to provide a well-rounded representation.
  3. Logistical challenges: Capturing a high-angle shot may require access to elevated positions, such as neighboring buildings or specialized equipment like drones, which can be logistically challenging or restricted in certain locations. This can be managed by scouting the location in advance, obtaining necessary permissions, and having backup plans in case of accessibility issues.
  4. Lighting and weather: High-angle shots can be more susceptible to changes in lighting and weather conditions, as the elevated perspective may expose the property to harsh shadows, glare, or atmospheric haze. This can be addressed by planning the shoot for optimal times of day, using appropriate camera settings and filters, and being prepared to adapt to changing conditions on the day of the shoot.

IMMERSIVE INSIDER SHOT

The immersive insider shot is a photography technique that aims to capture the interior of a property in a way that makes the viewer feel as if they are standing inside the space. This is achieved by using wide-angle lenses, strategic composition, and careful attention to lighting and detail. The goal is to create an image that showcases the room’s best features, conveys a sense of depth and space, and evokes an emotional response from potential buyers.

Using plenty of natural light, light-reflecting tools, and a camera that takes high quality shots with excellent clarity brings the inside of any property to life. This attracts buyers who are looking for more detailed images that truly reflect the interior of a home. 

A room with a couch and a book, perfect for first-time homebuyers.
A room with a couch and a book, perfect for first-time homebuyers.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the immersive insider shot is its ability to create a strong emotional connection between the viewer and the property. By making the viewer feel as if they are physically present in the space, this technique can help potential buyers envision themselves living in the home and create a sense of attachment or desire. Additionally, immersive insider shots can showcase the unique character and style of a room, highlight key features or selling points, and provide a more comprehensive understanding of the layout and flow of the interior space.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Distortion and perspective: Wide-angle lenses, which are often used for immersive insider shots, can sometimes result in distortion or exaggerated perspective, particularly around the edges of the frame. This can make the space appear larger or more elongated than it is in reality, which may be misleading for potential buyers. This can be mitigated by using appropriate focal lengths, correcting for distortion in post-processing, and including additional shots from different angles to provide a more accurate representation of the space.
  2. Lighting challenges: Capturing an immersive insider shot that showcases the best features of a room often requires careful control and balance of lighting. Harsh shadows, glare, or uneven illumination can detract from the overall impact of the image and make the space feel less inviting. This can be addressed by using professional lighting equipment, techniques like HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography, and post-processing to optimize exposure and color balance.
  3. Styling and decluttering: To create an effective immersive insider shot, the room must be carefully styled and decluttered to remove any distracting or unappealing elements. This can be time-consuming and may require collaboration with homeowners or professional stagers, which can add to the overall cost and complexity of the shoot. However, investing in proper styling and preparation can greatly enhance the final result and increase the property’s appeal to potential buyers.
  4. Limited context: While immersive insider shots provide a detailed and engaging view of individual rooms, they may not always convey the broader context or layout of the property as a whole. This can be addressed by including a mix of wide-angle and detail shots, as well as supplementary materials like floor plans or virtual tours, to help potential buyers understand how the various spaces relate to one another and fit within the overall structure of the home.

GUIDED WALKABOUT SHOTS (AND VIDEOS)

Guided walkabout shots and videos are a dynamic and engaging way to showcase a property, providing potential buyers with an immersive, first-person perspective of the home and its features. This technique involves a guided tour of the property, typically led by a real estate agent or the homeowner, who walks through the space while capturing video footage or a series of photographs.

With video content performing exceptionally well on just about every social media platform, adding motion to your property listing gallery is a great mechanism for added impact and online traffic. Short videos and walkthroughs give buyers a real feel for a property and make it even easier for you to show off special features that deserve a closer look.

A drawing of a living room, showcasing must-have shots for listings.
A drawing of a living room, showcasing must-have shots for listings.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of guided walkabout shots and videos is their ability to create a sense of personal connection and familiarity with the property. By simulating the experience of walking through the home, this technique allows potential buyers to better understand the layout, flow, and scale of the space, as well as discover unique features and details that may not be apparent in static images. Additionally, the guided aspect of the walkabout provides an opportunity to highlight key selling points, provide context and commentary, and create a more engaging and memorable experience for viewers.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Quality and stability: Capturing high-quality, stable footage while walking through a property can be challenging, particularly if the person guiding the tour is not experienced with videography techniques. Shaky, poorly lit, or low-resolution footage can be distracting and may not showcase the property in its best light. This can be mitigated by using stabilized equipment, such as gimbals or steadicams, and ensuring proper lighting and camera settings.
  2. Length and pacing: Guided walkabout videos can sometimes be lengthy or slow-paced, which may cause viewers to lose interest or skip ahead. This can be addressed by carefully planning the route and content of the tour, using engaging commentary and visual cues to maintain viewer attention, and editing the final footage to a concise and dynamic format.
  3. Limited artistic control: Unlike static photography, guided walkabout shots and videos may not allow for as much control over composition, lighting, and styling. This can result in a more candid or less polished appearance, which may not always align with the desired brand aesthetic. This can be managed by setting clear guidelines and expectations for the tour, rehearsing the route and content in advance, and using post-processing techniques to enhance the final product.
  4. Accessibility and viewing limitations: Guided walkabout videos may not always be easily accessible or viewable for all potential buyers, particularly those with slower internet connections or limited bandwidth. Additionally, some viewers may prefer to explore the property at their own pace or focus on specific areas of interest, which may not be possible with a pre-recorded tour. This can be addressed by offering multiple viewing options, such as downloadable files or interactive 360-degree tours, and providing supplementary materials like floor plans and static images.
 

Rules for Walkthrough filming

To capture effective guided walkabout shots and videos for first-time homebuyer listings, it’s important to think beyond static imagery. With video content performing exceptionally well on social media platforms, adding motion to your property listing gallery is a great way to increase impact and online traffic.

Focus on the following focal points when filming walkthroughs for different property types:

  1. Plan your route in advance: Before starting to record, map out a logical path that flows smoothly from one area to the next. This helps create a coherent narrative and avoids disorienting jumps or backtracking.
  2. Highlight key features: As you move through the property, focus on unique selling points and attractive features that will catch a buyer’s eye. Linger on impressive architectural details, updated fixtures, spacious rooms, and desirable amenities.
  3. Use a stabilizer: To prevent shaky or jarring footage, use a gimbal stabilizer or steadicam to keep the camera smooth and level while you walk. This creates a more polished and professional look that’s easier for viewers to follow.

Short videos and walkthroughs following these guidelines give potential buyers a real feel for the property and allow you to showcase its most appealing aspects in a dynamic and engaging way. This type of immersive content can help your listings stand out and attract more serious first-time homebuyers when combined with eye-level shots.

EYE-LEVEL SHOT

The eye-level shot is a photography technique that captures the exterior or interior of a property from a height that simulates the perspective of a person standing in front of or inside the home. This shot aims to provide a more natural and relatable view of the property, allowing potential buyers to imagine themselves in the space.

A kitchen with a large island and stools, perfect for first-time homebuyers browsing listings.
A kitchen with a large island and stools, perfect for first-time homebuyers browsing listings.

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the eye-level shot is its ability to create a sense of familiarity and relatability for potential buyers. By presenting the property from a perspective that mimics human vision, the eye-level shot helps viewers feel more connected to the space and visualize themselves living there. This technique is particularly effective for showcasing the flow and layout of a home’s interior, as it provides a more accurate representation of how rooms connect and how the space would be experienced in person.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Less dramatic impact: Compared to the upward-facing ground floor shot or other more creative angles, the eye-level shot may not have the same dramatic or attention-grabbing impact. This can be mitigated by ensuring the composition, lighting, and styling of the shot are carefully considered to create an engaging and attractive image.
  2. Limited sense of scale: Eye-level shots may not always convey the full scale or grandeur of a property, especially for larger or more impressive homes. This can be addressed by including additional shots from different angles or using a wider lens to capture more of the space in a single frame.
  3. Obstructed views: In some cases, eye-level shots may be obstructed by furniture, walls, or other elements within the property, making it difficult to showcase certain features or convey the full layout. This can be overcome by carefully selecting the best vantage points and using supplementary shots to provide a more comprehensive view of the space.
  4. Reduced privacy perception: Eye-level shots that include windows or other openings may create a sense of reduced privacy, as they simulate the perspective of someone looking directly into the property. This can be managed by carefully selecting the angles and framing of the shots to minimize any potential concerns.

UPWARD-FACING GROUND FLOOR SHOT

The upward-facing ground floor shot, also known as the “hero shot,” is a photography technique that captures the exterior of a property from a low angle, pointing upwards to emphasize the grandeur and scale of the building. This shot is often used to showcase the front facade, entrance, or unique architectural features of a home.

High angled photo of a entrance of a house for sale
High angled photo of a entrance of a house for sale

Main benefit: The primary advantage of the upward-facing ground floor shot is its ability to create a sense of grandeur and importance. By shooting from a low angle, the property appears larger and more impressive, which can help attract potential buyers’ attention and create a memorable first impression. This technique is particularly effective for highlighting distinctive design elements, such as columns, arches, or intricate brickwork, making the property stand out from others on the market.

Possible drawbacks:

  1. Distortion: Shooting from a low angle can sometimes result in a slightly distorted perspective, making vertical lines appear to converge or causing the property to look disproportionate. This can be mitigated by using a tilt-shift lens or correcting the perspective in post-processing.
  2. Limited context: The upward-facing ground floor shot often focuses solely on the property itself, which may not provide much context about its surroundings or neighborhood. This can be addressed by including additional shots that showcase the property’s location and nearby amenities.
  3. Reduced relatability: While the hero shot can create a striking visual impact, it may not always feel as relatable or inviting to potential buyers compared to eye-level shots that provide a more natural perspective. Consider balancing upward-facing shots with other angles to give a comprehensive view of the property.
  4. Lighting challenges: Depending on the time of day and the property’s orientation, achieving the perfect lighting for an upward-facing shot can be challenging. Harsh shadows or overexposed areas may require additional equipment or post-processing to ensure the final image looks its best.

COMMON REAL ESTATE SOCIAL MEDIA PITFALLS: HOW TO AVOID MISTAKES

To avoid common real estate social media pitfalls, incorporate catchy headlines, generate leads on visual content platforms, and use the right camera.

Catchy headlines that capture the essence of what makes a listing unique help grab buyers’ attention more quickly and connect them with the content they are most interested in, if the headlines directly relate to compelling shots.

Visual content platforms like Instagram, TikTok, and Pinterest are great places to gather inspiration (pinterest) and generate leads (TikTok and Instagram), if you engage with audience members and industry collaborators to build meaningful relationships online.

Getting the perfect shot for first-time homebuyer listings starts with the right real estate camera.

Choose from a range of cameras depending on your needs, such as drones for immersive, high-quality aerial shots that showcase the property’s surroundings and overall layout, if you want to provide a unique perspective and highlight the location’s appeal.

Good real estate DSLRs are ideal for capturing high-resolution interior and exterior images with excellent depth of field, if you need to emphasize the property’s architectural details and design elements.

Smartphones equipped with gimbals and wide lenses are perfect for creating engaging, authentic video content and behind-the-scenes footage, if you want to give potential buyers a more personal and relatable look at the property and your real estate agency.

A man in a suit standing in front of a toilet, featured in must-have shots for first-time homebuyer listings.
A man in a suit standing in front of a toilet, featured in not must-have shots for first-time homebuyer listings.

The importance of capturing shots that convey the full potential of the property cannot be emphasized enough. By avoiding common real estate marketing mistakes, you can avoid losing out on first-time buyers and instead create listings that stand out and inspire potential sales.

TAKE SHOTS THAT SELL HOUSES

Taking a wide variety of shots from every angle and making sure they are captured with the right camera will ensure your property images stand out among the crowd. It will also help you to generate real estate leads, increase engagement, and, most importantly, close a sale.

Real estate marketing is multi-faceted, but if you get these shots right, you’re well on your way to attracting your target audience and selling them their first homes.