Who can use the konmari method?

The KonMari method can be used by almost anyone looking to declutter and organize their home and possessions. As a simple, adaptable system, most anyone dealing with clutter can embrace the KonMari method’s transformative power. The only key requirement is a commitment to the tidying process.

Here is a breakdown of who can specifically benefit from the KonMari method:

  • Households – Families, couples, roommates, and individuals living in overcrowded homes can use KonMari to reduce clutter. Its category-based approach works for all household possessions.
  • House sellers or buyers – The KonMari method can help prepare homes for listing or showing by decluttering and organizing possessions. Sparking joy and curating belongings make spaces appear clean, attractive and spacious to potential buyers.
  • Small spaces – The KonMari method is especially helpful for organizing small living spaces like apartments, tiny homes, dorms, and RVs. Space-saving techniques like folding clothes vertically help maximize limited storage.
  • Disorganized people – Those who consider themselves messy or chronically disorganized can use the KonMari structure and decision-making tips to develop tidying habits.
  • Sentimental people – The KonMari method’s process of thanking items honors sentimental attachments before letting go of things that don’t spark joy anymore.
  • Stress-prone people – By clearing clutter, the KonMari method can provide a calmer environment and mental health benefits for people prone to anxiety or stress.
  • Busy people – Even busy people can handle KonMari’s tidying marathons concentrated into blocks of time with visible results. The maintenance is manageable too.
  • Minimalists – People looking to minimize their possessions can appreciate the KonMari method’s joy-based approach to identifying items to discard.
George Nicola
George Nicola

George is a seasoned interior designer and property marketing strategist with over 13 years of experience. He specializes in transforming properties into visually stunning spaces, helping clients recognize the potential and beauty in each property. With an impressive international client base of exciting projects throughout Europe and America.

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TL;DR

The KonMari method is a popular decluttering technique developed by Marie Kondo, a Japanese organizing consultant and author. The method involves organizing items by category rather than by location and keeping only those items that “spark joy.”

Pronunciation:

  • KonMari is pronounced “cone-MAR-ee”
  • The “o” sounds have an long “oh” vowel sound
  • Emphasis goes on the second syllable – “MAR”

Spelling:

  • It’s spelled K-O-N-M-A-R-I
  • No “u” after the “o” letters
  • The “kon” prefix means something like “to tidy” in Japanese
  • Named after its founder Marie Kondo

The main benefits of KonMari are improved organization, promoted mindfulness, elicited gratitude, creation of peaceful spaces and habitats, and accumulated wisdom for preventing re-cluttering. Downsides can be the initial time input needed, difficulty detaching from some possessions, lack of focus on functional organization and ongoing maintenance of the method.

With reasonable expectations and commitment, most draw profound inspiration from KonMari’s life-changing magic.

To follow the KonMari method, one must start by visualizing their ideal lifestyle and setting a clear goal for their decluttering process. 

Then, they must sort their belongings into categories such as clothing, books, papers, and miscellaneous items. For each category, they must gather all the items in one place and go through them one by one, deciding which items to keep based on whether they spark joy or not.

In the following sections, we will explore how to follow the KonMari method step by step, providing practical tips and advice for a successful decluttering journey.

What is the Konmari Method?

The Konmari Method is a decluttering and organizing philosophy created by Marie Kondo, a Japanese organizing consultant and author. The method is based on the idea of keeping only the items that spark joy and discarding the rest.

The Konmari Method is relevant to Japandi, a design trend that combines Japanese minimalism and Scandinavian simplicity. The method emphasizes the importance of creating a space that is both functional and aesthetically pleasing, which is a key aspect of Japandi design. That is the reason the interiors where she lives are Japandi style.

The Konmari Method has many similarities with Marie Kondo’s teachings. Both emphasize the importance of tidying by category instead of location, starting with clothes and ending with sentimental items. Both also encourage expressing gratitude towards items that are discarded and keeping only the items that truly spark joy.

To follow the Konmari Method, one must go through a specific order of categories: clothing, books, papers, komono (miscellaneous items), and sentimental items. Within each category, all items must be gathered and evaluated one by one, deciding whether to keep or discard based on whether or not they spark joy.

  • As a child, Marie Kondo was obsessed with organizing. She began dedicating herself to learning new cleaning and organizing techniques from a young age.
  • In her late teens in the early 2000s, Kondo began developing her own unique tidying philosophy and method while working part-time as a house cleaner in Tokyo.
  • Kondo formally established her tidying consultant business in 2006, when she was around 21 years old. This is likely when she consolidated her KonMari method.
  • In 2010, at age 25, Marie Kondo published her first book on her KonMari method, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” This launched the KonMari method to national and later international fame as the book became a global bestseller translated into over 30 languages.

Komono is a category in the KonMari method that refers to miscellaneous items in the home that don’t fit into the other main tidy-up categories like clothes, books, papers, and sentimental items.

Some examples of komono items are:

  • Kitchen tools and equipment (utensils, appliances, cookware)
  • Bath and beauty products (cosmetics, skincare, hair accessories)
  • Cleaning items (cleaning tools, supplies, laundry items)
  • Garage or workshop tools and supplies
  • Electronics (cords, gadgets, media, cameras)
  • Wallets, bags, pouches
  • Small household decorations
  • Toys, hobby supplies, craft items
  • Pet supplies
  • Linens (towels, blankets)
  • Spare change, keys, reusable shopping bags

Basically, the komono category is a catch-all group for the mismatched set of everyday household items that keeps our lives functional and homes operating smoothly. Any frequently used items that aren’t clothing, books, paper documents, or mementos falls under komono.

is konmari based on a japaniese philosphy?

Yes, the KonMari method for tidying and decluttering developed by Marie Kondo does have its roots in some traditional Japanese philosophies. Some of the key connections include:

  1. Shinto animism – This is the Japanese religion’s concept that objects have a spirit or soul. KonMari has respondents thank items before letting them go, based on this idea of respecting an object’s essence.
  2. Wabi-sabi acceptance – The Japanese worldview values imperfect beauty and accepts transient phases in life. Similarly, KonMari focuses on objects best serving current needs rather than insisting on keeping expensive or unused gifts.
  3. Japandi aesthetic – The KonMari approach intersects beautifully with the core Japandi (Japanese + Scandinavian) design values of simplicity, functionality, and minimalism. Tidying using the KonMari method creates the clean, clutter-free, calming spaces that exemplify Japandi ideals. 
  4. Mindfulness principles – Being present and attentive to one’s space reflects Zen Buddhist thinking. Evaluating which belongings “spark joy” involves conscious awareness and reflection from KonMari practitioners.
  5. Ritualized order – Structured processes feature heavily in Japanese tea ceremonies, martial arts, and other cultural mainstays as well. KonMari also follows precise order and techniques for sorting categories.

So while Marie Kondo formulated her own unique system, the concepts of animism, acceptance, mindfulness, and ritual provide the ideological framework underpinning the KonMari Method. 

These Japanese philosophical influences are reflected in the respectful, mindful, and transformative approach Kondo advocates for keeping orderly, serene spaces.

Pros and cons of the method konmari

While the KonMari method requires commitment, its systematic approach to decluttering, focus on curating possessions mindfully, and creation of peaceful spaces resonates strongly with many. But the method may not suit everyone’s preferences or circumstances.

The main benefit of this decluttering method is its simple yet structured step-by-step process of tackling categories makes KonMari accessible. The visible results from intensive tidying “marathons” keeps enthusiasm high despite initial heavy time investments. Maintaining tidy, serene spaces is more manageable after KonMari’s reset.

Pros of decluttering with Konmari

A woman practicing the Konmari Method, follows it by holding a basket of decluttered items.
A woman practicing the Konmari Method, follows it by holding a basket of decluttered items.

Decluttering with the KonMari method has several benefits, both tangible and intangible, that can significantly improve your quality of life:

  1. Mental Health: Decluttering your physical space can also declutter your mind. Many people find that their stress levels decrease after organizing their home using the KonMari method.
  2. Time Management: The KonMari method can save you time as you no longer have to look for things. You know exactly where everything is, which reduces the time spent worrying about and maintaining your belongings.
  3. Productivity: A decluttered space can increase your ability to focus and concentrate, leading to improved productivity.
  4. Physical Health: A tidy home makes for easier cleaning and less dirt and dust build-up, which can reduce the risk of germs and pests. This can also free up more time for exercise and healthy eating.
  5. Improved Shopping Habits: The KonMari method can make you a more conscious buyer, reducing impulsive purchases and saving you money.
  6. Easier Cleaning: With less clutter, cleaning your house takes less time. There will be less laundry to wash, fewer books to dust, and fewer items to move when you need to clean a shelf or vacuum the floor.
  7. Personal Growth: The KonMari method can help you develop a sense of personal taste, making you more aware of your likes and dislikes. This can influence your shopping habits, leading to more thoughtful purchases.
  8. Improved Sleep Quality: A clean and organized environment can improve sleep quality.
  9. Increased Sense of Gratitude: The act of folding and organizing your belongings can help you express gratitude, which is at the heart of the KonMari method. This can lead to better self-care.
  10. Boosted Self-Esteem and Mood: Decluttering can raise self-esteem, lift moods, and open you up to change, putting you in a better position to reach your potential.

Helps declutter and organize living spaces effectively. By tidying by category and only keeping items that “spark joy,” the KonMari method helps people pare down possessions.

Promotes mindfulness. The process of evaluating each item’s purpose and meaning can make people more mindful of their belongings and consumption habits.

Encourages gratitude. Thanking items that are discarded promotes gratitude for what one owns.

Creates calm surroundings. The tidy, joy-centric environment facilitated by the KonMari method can have mental health benefits.

Simple systematic approach. The step-by-step guidance is straightforward to implement.

Cons of decluttering with Konmari

An illustration of a decluttered living room with a couch and bookshelves.
An illustration of a decluttered living room with a couch and bookshelves.

The main disadvantage of the method is that it’s time-consuming initially. Completing the entire decluttering process properly requires a significant time investment upfront 2 to 4 days for a small house or apartment and 5 to 7 days for a larger house top to bottom.

Decluttering with the KonMari method, while beneficial for many, does have its drawbacks. Here are some cons associated with this decluttering approach:

  1. Joy as a Subjective Measure: The central KonMari criterion of keeping items that “spark joy” can be unrealistic or impractical for some people. Not all necessary items bring joy, and this standard may not apply well to utilitarian objects.
  2. Intensive Process: The method advocates for marathon decluttering sessions, aiming for perfection, which can be overwhelming and unrealistic, especially for larger homes or for individuals with busy schedules.
  3. Emotional Impact: The process can create guilt or anxiety around possessions, particularly for those prone to such feelings. The pressure to discard items that don’t spark joy might lead to regret or stress.
  4. One-Size-Fits-All Approach: The prescriptive nature of the KonMari method may not suit everyone’s personal style or preferences. Some may find the strict adherence to the method’s rules to be too rigid.
  5. Cultural Differences: The method was developed in Japan, where homes and lifestyles may differ significantly from those in Western countries. This can make some of the advice less applicable or harder to implement in larger or differently structured homes.
  6. Time-Consuming: The process requires a significant time commitment to sort through all possessions by category, which can be a major undertaking for those with extensive belongings.
  7. Difficulty with Sentimental Items: Some people may struggle with the emotional aspect of letting go of sentimental items, even if they don’t necessarily “spark joy”.
  8. Potential Waste: The focus on discarding items can lead to waste if not done thoughtfully. It’s important to consider the environmental impact of disposing of large quantities of items.
  9. Maintenance Required: After the initial decluttering, the KonMari method requires ongoing effort to maintain the organization and prevent re-cluttering, which can be challenging for some.
  10. Limited Scope: The method focuses primarily on physical clutter and may not address the root causes of why clutter accumulates in the first place, such as shopping habits or emotional attachments.

While the KonMari method has helped many achieve a more organized living space, it’s important to consider these potential downsides and adapt the method to fit individual needs and circumstances.

The Konmari Method Book Review

One of the most popular and effective ways to learn about the KonMari method is through Marie Kondo’s book, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” In this book, Kondo outlines her philosophy on decluttering and organizing, as well as providing step-by-step instructions for implementing the KonMari method in your own home.

Play Video about A series of drawings capturing the Konmari method of decluttering in a home.

The book is divided into five sections, each corresponding to one of the KonMari method’s categories: clothing, books, papers, komono (miscellaneous items), and sentimental items. Kondo emphasizes the importance of discarding items that no longer spark joy and keeping only those that truly make you happy.

Throughout the book, Kondo provides practical tips and techniques for decluttering and organizing each category, such as folding clothes in a specific way to save space and make them easier to see.

The author of the book addresses common obstacles that people may face during the decluttering process, such as sentimental attachment to items and difficulty letting go of things that were expensive or have not been used in a long time.

We’ve read and researched online reviews about the book and here is what we’ve discovered:

While many enthusiasts have embraced Kondo’s extreme approach to clutter, others find some aspects of the KonMari method to be impractical or unrealistic. The notion of tidying one’s entire house in one fell swoop, as the method prescribes, seems unfeasible for most readers living in larger Western homes as it could take days if not weeks.

The prospect of gathering every single item and sorting through the keepers may work for those in small city apartments but is daunting in three-story suburban houses filled with years of accumulated possessions.

The book’s emphasis on discarding items was seen as too extreme by some, who felt that it did not adequately address the need to love and maintain the items one chooses to keep.

While minimizing clutter should be the goal, some feel that items like tools or kitchen appliances can still be useful to keep on hand even if they don’t spark positive emotions.

“The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” is an excellent resource for anyone looking to implement the KonMari method in their own life. It provides clear and practical guidance, as well as inspiration and motivation to create a home that truly sparks joy.

Other methods for decluttering vs Konmari

Here are some other popular decluttering methods that are alternatives to the KonMari method:

The Minimalist Method

  • Focuses on reducing possessions to only the essentials
  • Calls for decluttering in multiple phases – first 30 items, then 50, etc until most items are discarded
  • Prioritizes necessity over sentimental value

The Capsule Wardrobe Method

  • Streamlines closets down to versatile mix-and-match basics
  • Limits clothing selection to staple pieces in coordinating colors
  • Makes getting dressed easier and shopping simpler

The Flylady System

  • Breaks tasks down into manageable daily “baby steps”
  • Uses timers, structured routines, and checklists
  • Focuses on establishing long-term decluttering habits

Dana White’s Method

  • Starts with quick initial cleanup of each space
  • Sorts items into just 4 categories: trash, donate, keep, or uncertain
  • Uses decision fatigue to make faster decisions

Margareta Magnusson’s Gentle Method

  • Aims to respect sentimentality during decluttering
  • Slower paced, less extreme approach
  • Focuses on one small area, box, or pile at a time

Conmari vs The minimalist method

KonMari aims broadly to organize through joy-focused decluttering, while capsule wardrobes narrowly target streamlining clothing into coordinating essentials. The two can certainly complement each other in creating simpler, happier homes.

The KonMari and Capsule Wardrobe methods differ mainly in their scope and purpose, with KonMari focusing on decluttering one’s whole home and capsule wardrobes streamlining just clothing.

The key differences between the two methods are:

Purpose:

The KonMari method aims to organize and spark joy in all possessions, whereas capsule wardrobes target building a versatile, mix-and-match clothing collection.

Scope:

The KonMari method covers decluttering and organizing all household items by category. Capsule wardrobes strictly apply to streamlining one’s closet and clothing.

Criteria:

The KonMari method uses joy and emotional resonance as the criteria for keeping items. Capsule wardrobes select versatile basics that offer multiple outfits combinations.

Approach:

The KonMari approach evaluates categories of items collectively in tidying marathons. Capsule wardrobes build coordinated wardrobes gradually through planned purchasing and discarding.

Ongoing Effort:

The KonMari method relies on maintenance habits after the major tidying event. Capsule wardrobes require continual editing as styles and needs change.

Conmari vs The Flylady System

The KonMari method offers a structured, accelerated marathon to tidy by category, while the Flylady system builds gradual, customizable decluttering routines optimized for habit formation over time.

The key differences are:

Pace:

The KonMari method involves an intense tidying marathon by category. The Flylady system breaks decluttering into small, manageable daily baby steps.

Structure:

The KonMari method follows a rigid order of categories and specific techniques. Flylady uses checklists and routines but no fixed sequence.

Customization:

The KonMari sequence is generally standardized for everyone. Flylady can be customized by only doing relevant daily/weekly tasks.

Time Investment:

KonMari requires focused blocks of time for marathon tidying sessions. Flylady only involves 15-30 minutes per daily task.

Philosophy:

KonMari prioritizes sparking joy and visualizing lifestyles. Flylady emphasizes establishing lifelong decluttering habits.

Conmari vs Dana White's Method

KonMari takes a slower joy-focused approach, while Dana White offers a quick, necessity-based decluttering sprint. Elements of these can be combined for an personalized method.

The key differences are:

Decision Criteria:

The KonMari method relies on whether an item sparks joy. Dana White bases decisions on whether items are actually useful or needed.

Pace:

KonMari systematically works through categories over a continuous period. Dana White does an initial quick cleanout followed by evaluating the uncertain items.

Emotional Considerations:

KonMari acknowledges items’ emotional significance before discarding. Dana White focuses on utility over sentimentality.

Classification:

KonMari meticulously sorts through every possession by category. Dana White uses just four action categories (trash, donate, keep, uncertain).

Ongoing Effort:

KonMari requires maintaining tidying habits long-term post-decluttering. Dana White decluttering pushes to finish in a short initial sprint.

Conmari vs The Capsule Wardrobe Method

The KonMari and Capsule Wardrobe methods differ mainly in their scope and purpose, with KonMari focusing on decluttering one’s whole home and capsule wardrobes streamlining just clothing.

The key differences between the two methods are:

Purpose: The KonMari method aims to organize and spark joy in all possessions, whereas capsule wardrobes target building a versatile, mix-and-match clothing collection.

Scope: The KonMari method covers decluttering and organizing all household items by category. Capsule wardrobes strictly apply to streamlining one’s closet and clothing.

Criteria: The KonMari method uses joy and emotional resonance as the criteria for keeping items. Capsule wardrobes select versatile basics that offer multiple outfits combinations.

Approach: The KonMari approach evaluates categories of items collectively in tidying marathons. Capsule wardrobes build coordinated wardrobes gradually through planned purchasing and discarding.

Ongoing Effort: The KonMari method relies on maintenance habits after the major tidying event. Capsule wardrobes require continual editing as styles and needs change.

KonMari aims broadly to organize through joy-focused decluttering, while capsule wardrobes narrowly target streamlining clothing into coordinating essentials. The two can certainly complement each other in creating simpler, happier homes.

Conmari vs Margareta Magnusson's Gentle Method

The KonMari and Margareta Magnusson’s Gentle decluttering methods differ primarily in their pace and emotional approach, with KonMari being more accelerated and Magnusson more sentimentality-focused.

The key differences are:

Pace: The KonMari method involves intensive tidying marathons by category. Magnusson’s method takes a slower, more gradual approach over time.

Emotional Aspect: KonMari acknowledges but quickly moves on from items’ emotional ties. Magnusson’s method very gradually detaches from sentimental items.

Scale: KonMari tackles entire home categories at once. Magnusson declutters one small area, box, or pile at a time.

Rules: KonMari follows a specific sequence of categories with prescribed techniques. Magnusson has guidelines but no strict system.

Joy Focus: At its core, KonMari is about sparking joy. Magnusson seeks functional, livable spaces with some joy.

The KonMari methodology accelerates decluttering through joy-focused, categorical tidying marathons, while Magnusson offers a sentimentality-honoring, gradual approach. Both can lead to more serene spaces.

Preparing for the Konmari Process

Before diving into the Konmari method, it is important to prepare oneself mentally and emotionally.

The process can be overwhelming, but with the right mindset and approach, it can be a transformative experience that leads to a more organized and joyful life. Here are some key steps to take before starting the Konmari process:

Committing to Tidying Up

The first step in preparing for the Konmari process is to commit to tidying up. This means setting aside dedicated time to go through your belongings and being willing to let go of items that no longer serve a purpose or bring you joy. It is important to approach the process with an open mind and a willingness to change.

Visualizing Your Ideal Lifestyle

Another important step in preparing for the Konmari process is to visualize your ideal lifestyle. This means thinking about what kind of environment you want to live in and what kind of person you want to be. By having a clear vision of your ideal lifestyle, you can better determine which items in your home support that vision and which do not.

Discarding First

One of the key principles of the Konmari method is to discard first before organizing. This means going through each item in your home and deciding whether it brings you joy or not. If an item does not bring you joy, it is time to let it go. By discarding first, you can create space for the items that truly matter to you.

Tidying by Category, Not Location

Finally, it is important to tidy by category, not location. This means going through each category of items in your home (clothing, books, papers, komono, and sentimental items) and deciding which items to keep and which to discard. By tidying by category, you can get a better sense of how much you have of each item and make more informed decisions about what to keep and what to let go.

By following these key steps, you can prepare yourself for the Konmari process and set yourself up for success. Remember to approach the process with an open mind and a willingness to change, and you will be well on your way to a more organized and joyful life.

Examples of konmari method on a pantry

An illustration of a pantry full of clothes and other items, showcasing the Konmari Method for decluttering and organizing a home.
An illustration of a pantry full of clothes and other items, showcasing the Konmari Method for decluttering and organizing a home.
 Here are some specific steps to apply the KonMari method to your pantry:
  1. Discard Unnecessary Items: The first step in the KonMari method is to discard items that no longer serve a purpose or bring joy. This includes expired foods, rarely used ingredients, and surplus food that you cannot possibly consume.
  2. Organize by Category: The KonMari method encourages tidying by category, not by location.Basic pantry subcategories could include seasonings, dried foods, dry carbohydrates (like pasta, rice, couscous), canned goods, sweets, bread, and supplements.
  3. Store Items Upright: If the packaging allows, store items in an upright position. This makes it easier to see what you have at a glance and helps maintain organization.
  4. Use Clear Storage Containers: Transferring dried goods to matching canisters not only increases the joy factor but also makes it easier to see what’s inside.
  5. Designate a Specific Place for Each Item: Put items back in the same place each time, and it will become a habit. This helps maintain the organization over time.
  6. Keep a Certain Amount of Empty Space: Just like keeping your fridge about 30% empty to have space for leftovers, the same rule applies to pantries.

While the KonMari method encourages living among items you truly cherish, it’s not strictly about minimalism. It’s more about surrounding yourself with the items and objects that spark joy.

Remember that the KonMari method is not just about physical tidying; it also places great importance on being mindful, introspective, and forward-looking. As you organize your pantry, you’re also taking steps to create a more serene living environment.

 

Examples of konmari method on a wardrobe

An illustration of a meticulously organized closet with neatly folded clothes and bags, following the Konmari method for decluttering.
An illustration of a meticulously organized closet with neatly folded clothes and bags, following the Konmari method for decluttering.

Applying the KonMari method to a wardrobe involves a series of steps that focus on decluttering and organizing clothing in a way that promotes joy and efficiency. 

Here are the steps to follow:

  1. Commit to Tidying Up: Fully commit to the process of organizing your wardrobe. This mental commitment is crucial for the success of the method.
  2. Envision Your Ideal Lifestyle: Before you start, visualize the lifestyle you wish to achieve. This will guide you in deciding which items to keep.
  3. Discard First: Begin by discarding items. Remove everything from your wardrobe and go through each item one by one, asking yourself if it sparks joy. If it doesn’t, thank it for its service and let it go. This includes clothes that are no longer in fashion, don’t fit, or are not worn anymore.
  4. Tidy by Category: Organize your clothing by category rather than by location. Start with tops, then move on to bottoms, and continue through each category of clothing until everything has been sorted.
  5. Folding Technique: Use the KonMari folding method to fold clothes neatly and store them upright. This technique saves space and makes it easier to see and access your clothes. It can be applied to most clothing items, including shirts, pants, and even socks and underwear.
  6. Hanging Clothes: For clothes that are better suited for hanging, Marie Kondo recommends hanging them by weight, with heavier items on the left and lighter items on the right. This creates a sense of order and can make your closet more visually appealing.
  7. Organize by Joy: After discarding and folding, organize your clothes in a way that prioritizes joy. This means placing the items that make you happiest in the most accessible places.
  8. Maintain Your Tidying: Once your wardrobe is organized, make an effort to maintain it. This involves putting things back in their designated places and regularly reviewing your items to ensure they still bring you joy.
  9. Mindfulness and Forward-Looking: The KonMari method is not just about organizing physical items; it’s also about being mindful and introspective. As you tidy your wardrobe, consider how each item contributes to the lifestyle you want to lead.

Examples of konmari method on a garage

Konmari method for garage decluttering,
Konmari method for garage decluttering,

Applying the KonMari method to a garage, especially when organizing tools and storing seasonal items, involves several key steps:

  1. Discard and Donate: The first step is to discard items that do not “spark joy” or are no longer useful. This includes tools that are broken or no longer needed, and seasonal items that are damaged or outdated.
  2. Tidy by Category: Marie Kondo recommends organizing items by category. For example, all hardware and tools should be grouped together, and all seasonal items should be stored together. This makes it easier to find what you need when you need it.
  3. Use Appropriate Storage Containers: For tools, use sturdy, clear storage boxes that allow you to see what’s inside. For seasonal items, use weather-proof containers to protect them from mold or dust. Stackable containers are recommended to maximize storage space. It’s also suggested to label your containers for easy identification.
  4. Store Items Properly: For tools, consider using wall-mounted shelves, baskets, and hooks for easy access and efficient use of space. For seasonal items, it’s recommended to store them in order of the holidays, from left to right. Also, heavy items should be stored on lower shelves for safety.
  5. Maintain the Organization: Once you’ve decluttered and organized your garage, it’s important to maintain the organization. This involves regularly reviewing what’s stored in the garage and discarding or donating items that are no longer needed.

Remember, the goal of the KonMari method is not just to declutter, but to create a space that brings joy and is easy to maintain.

Examples of konmari method under bed

The KonMari method, developed by Marie Kondo, emphasizes the use of simple, versatile, and durable storage containers that can help keep your space tidy and clutter-free. Here are some types of storage containers that are recommended for the KonMari method:

  1. Hikidashi Boxes: These boxes are sturdy, elegant, and versatile, making them ideal for storing cherished items. They can transform unstructured spaces like the inside of a drawer or a shelf into organized storage areas. Hikidashi boxes come in different sizes, suitable for various items, from clothing to office supplies.
  1. Stackable Storage Boxes: These boxes are perfect for maximizing space, especially in closets and drawers. They can be used to store a variety of items, from T-shirts to other non-bulky items that can be folded to stand upright. Some of these boxes come with detachable lids to protect against dust and can be collapsed when not in use.
  1. Bamboo and Cotton Storage Baskets: These baskets are collapsible and can be used to store a variety of items. They are made from breathable materials like cotton and sustainable bamboo, which are preferred by Marie Kondo.
  1. Clear Storage Boxes: Clear storage boxes are recommended because they allow you to see what’s inside without having to open each container. They come in various sizes and can be used to store a wide range of items.
  1. Repurposed Household Items: In line with the KonMari method’s emphasis on simplicity, you can also use repurposed household items as storage containers. This could include shoeboxes, bags, phone boxes, and food containers.

Remember, the key to choosing the right storage containers is to consider what you need to store. The containers should fit the items well and be suitable for the space where they will be placed. They should also be easy to use and access, helping to maintain a tidy and organized space

Following the Correct Order

When following the KonMari Method, it is important to tidy up in the correct order. The order in which you tidy up your belongings has been proven to be the most efficient and effective. Marie Kondo has conducted hours of tidying lessons with clients to come up with the ideal order.

Clothes

The first category to tidy up is clothes. This includes all types of clothing such as tops, bottoms, dresses, and shoes. Gather all of your clothes and put them in a pile. Then, go through each item one by one and ask yourself if it sparks joy. If it does not, thank it for its service and let it go.

Books

The second category is books. This category includes all types of reading materials such as novels, magazines, and textbooks. Gather all of your books and put them in a pile. Then, go through each book one by one and ask yourself if it sparks joy. If it does not, thank it for its service and let it go.

Papers

The third category is papers. This includes all types of paper such as bills, receipts, and letters. Gather all of your papers and put them in a pile. Then, go through each paper one by one and ask yourself if it sparks joy. If it does not, thank it for its service and let it go.

Komono (Miscellaneous Items)

The fourth category is komono, which includes all miscellaneous items such as kitchenware, electronics, and cosmetics. Gather all of your komono and put them in a pile. Then, go through each item one by one and ask yourself if it sparks joy. If it does not, thank it for its service and let it go.

Sentimental Items

The final category is sentimental items. This includes all items that hold sentimental value such as photographs and letters. Gather all of your sentimental items and put them in a pile. Then, go through each item one by one and ask yourself if it sparks joy. If it does not, thank it for its service and let it go.

By following the correct order, you will be able to declutter your home efficiently and effectively. Remember to only keep items that spark joy and thank the rest for their service.

Learning the Konmari Folding Technique

The Konmari folding technique is an essential part of the Konmari method, which is a popular decluttering and organizing approach developed by Marie Kondo. This technique helps to maximize space and keep your clothes organized, making it easier to find what you need and reducing clutter.

To start, it’s important to understand the basic principles of the Konmari folding technique. The technique involves folding clothes in a specific way to minimize wrinkles and maximize space. Here are the basic steps:

  1. Lay the clothing item flat on a surface.
  2. Fold the sides of the clothing item toward the center.
  3. Fold the bottom of the clothing item up to the top.
  4. Fold the clothing item in half or thirds, depending on the size of the item.

It’s important to note that the Konmari folding technique is not limited to just shirts and pants. It can be used for a wide variety of clothing items, including socks, underwear, and even towels.

One of the benefits of the Konmari folding technique is that it allows you to see all of your clothes at a glance. By folding clothes in a uniform way, you can stack them vertically in drawers or on shelves. This makes it easier to find what you need and prevents clothes from getting lost or forgotten.

Learning the Konmari folding technique is a simple but effective way to keep your clothes organized and minimize clutter. By following these basic steps, you can make the most of your storage space and keep your clothes looking neat and tidy.

Arranging Items to Spark Joy

Once you have decluttered your space using the KonMari method, it’s time to arrange the remaining items in a way that sparks joy. This means that each item should have a designated spot where it can be easily accessed and appreciated.

One strategy for arranging items is to group them by category, such as all of your books or all of your clothes. Within each category, you can further organize items by subcategory, such as separating shirts from pants or separating fiction from non-fiction books. This can help you see exactly what you have and prevent duplicates.

Another strategy is to use storage solutions that are both functional and aesthetically pleasing. For example, you might use decorative baskets or boxes to store items on shelves or under the bed. You might also use drawer dividers to keep smaller items organized and easily accessible.

When arranging items, it’s important to consider how they will be used and accessed. Items that are used frequently should be stored in easy-to-reach locations, while items that are used less frequently can be stored in less accessible areas. This can help you maintain a clutter-free space and prevent items from becoming disorganized over time.

Overall, arranging items to spark joy is an important part of the KonMari method. By taking the time to carefully organize your space, you can create a more peaceful and enjoyable environment that supports your physical and emotional well-being.

Maintaining a Tidy Space with KonMari

Once you have gone through the KonMari Method and decluttered your home, it’s important to maintain a tidy space. Here are some tips to help you keep your home organized and clutter-free:

  1. Designate a Home for Everything

One of the key principles of the KonMari Method is to keep only the things that spark joy. Once you have done that, it’s important to find a designated home for each item. This means that everything has a specific place where it belongs, and it should always be returned to that place when not in use.

  1. Regularly Declutter

Even after going through the KonMari Method, it’s important to regularly declutter your home. This means going through your belongings every few months and getting rid of anything that no longer brings you joy. By doing this regularly, you can prevent clutter from building up and keep your home organized.

  1. Use Storage Solutions

Storage solutions can be a great way to keep your home organized. Whether it’s using baskets, shelves, or other storage containers, having a designated place for everything can help keep your home tidy. Be sure to choose storage solutions that work for your specific needs and lifestyle.

  1. Practice Daily Tidying

Finally, practicing daily tidying can help you maintain a clutter-free home. This means taking a few minutes each day to put things away and tidy up. By doing this regularly, you can prevent clutter from building up and keep your home organized and tidy.

By following these tips, you can maintain a tidy and organized home after going through the KonMari Method. Remember to regularly declutter, designate a home for everything, use storage solutions, and practice daily tidying to keep your home clutter-free.

Can you use Konmari to pack when moving a house?

Yes, the KonMari method can actually be very useful when packing up possessions to move houses. 

Here are some tips for how to incorporate KonMari principles into your moving prep:

  1. Use packing as an opportunity to declutter further. As you categorically go through belongings, be ruthless about only keeping items that spark joy in your new home.
  2. Apply the KonMari folding method to clothes and linens to save space and prevent wrinkling in boxes and furniture. Vertically filed folded items can stand up nicely.
  3. Pack by category instead of by room. Gather all books together, all kitchen items together, etc. This makes unpacking easier by enabling you to focus on one category at a time in each room.
  4. Pack items from least-used to most-used categories. Start with off-season clothes and items you won’t need right away. End with essentials you’ll need first at your new home.
  5. Take photos of item placement in packed boxes to help guide your unpacking and reorganization. This helps restore your tidied joy-sparking systems.

Use KonMari tidying strategies to purge more items, utilize folding methods for efficient packing, categorize possessions for structured unpacking, and document placements to recreate your purposeful organization in your new living

Checklist and time plan for using the konmari method when moving a house

This KonMari timeline maximizes tidying before increased move chaos. Starting the process 6-8 weeks out provides enough time to thoughtfully curate possessions while following KonMari’s step-by-step order.

Here is a KonMari method checklist and timeplan to utilize when moving houses:

This KonMari timeline maximizes tidying before increased move chaos. Starting the process 6-8 weeks out provides enough time to thoughtfully curate possessions while following KonMari’s step-by-step order.

Here is a KonMari method checklist and timeplan to utilize when moving houses:

6-8 Weeks Before Move:

☑️ Visualize ideal lifestyle in new home
☑️ Read KonMari book/principles
☑️ Begin discarding items that don’t “spark joy”
☑️ Start using KonMari folding method for kept items

4-6 Weeks Before Move:

⏱️ Week 1: Tidy Clothes (2 hours/day)
⏱️ Week 2: Tidy Books (2 hours/day)
⏱️ Week 3: Tidy Papers (2 hours/day)
⏱️ Week 4: Tidy Komono (Miscellaneous Items) – Kitchen, Bathroom, Garage, Electronic Items (2 hours/day)
⏱️ Week 5: Tidy Sentimental Items – Photos, Memories (2 hours/day)

2-4 Weeks Before Move:

☑️ Pack items by category in labeled boxes
☑️ Take photos of packed box contents
☑️ Arrange for donation pick-ups/drop-offs

1 Week Before Move:

☑️ Finish labeling and stacking packed boxes
☑️ Pack essentials you’ll need right away separately
☑️ Clean out current home before furniture moves

Right After Moving:

☑️ Unpack 1 category a day using photos
☑️ Find designated places for items spark joy
☑️ Set up tidying/decluttering maintenance routine